Skip to Page Content Skip to the search box and translation tools

News details

Issaquah School District Moving to Fully Sustainable Power Sources

Posted by Elizabeth Egan on December 06, 2018

ISD becomes first Washington District to join Green Direct renewable energy program

Issaquah, WA—Issaquah’s schools are powered by hard work, compassion and expertise — and soon they’ll also be powered by the sun and the wind. The Issaquah School District has joined Green Direct, a Puget Sound Energy program that allows businesses and public organizations to purchase all of their electricity from renewable sources. ISD was one of 37 organizations—and the only school district—to join on for the launch of Green Direct.

Superintendent Ron Thiele said joining the program fits perfectly with the district’s goals of improving sustainability and lessening environmental impact. “We care about sustainability because we care about the future,” Thiele said. “The future will belong to our students, and we want to give them the kind of future they deserve.”

Because ISD and the other organizations have signed on to Green Direct, PSE will build a solar power plant in south-central Washington, set to begin operations in 2021. The power it produces will allow PSE to lessen its use of non-renewable power from sources such as coal plants.

Green Direct will also allow the District to better anticipate future electricity costs, said Chris Bruno, ISD’s Resource Conservation Manager. PSE has already set out the cost per kilowatt hour of electricity for the first 10 years within the program, beginning in 2021. That means the District won’t have to worry about unexpected fluctuations in the rate.

Participating in Green Direct continues Issaquah School District’s tradition of leading the way in sustainability issues, Bruno said. “We care about being leaders,” he said. “We care about making bold choices and being an example for others to follow.”

It’s especially important to set an example for the nearly 20,000 kids who attend the District’s schools, Thiele said. “We are role models for our students, and it’s important that we model for them how to take care of the environment and use our resources responsibly.”